Good Afternoon Jam

If you don’t have an abundance of fresh berries to hand, use mixed frozen berries instead; the bags often contain a good amount of varieties. Redcurrants and blackcurrants are high in pectin, which will help this jam set naturally. So make sure there is a good quantity of currants in the mix.

You’ll find this recipe in our book; Good Food For Your Table and we also sell a version of it in our shops, which won a Great Taste Award in 2013.

Preparation

Pick over the fruit and give it a wash.
Juice the lemon.


Sterilise five 330 g jam jars.

Place a plate in the freezer.

Method

Cook the fruit gently in a large saucepan in 300 ml of water and the lemon juice. The lemon juice will help extract pectin and also help the jam retain a good colour. Cook for about five minutes, to soften the skins.

Once the fruit has broken down, add the sugar and stir to dissolve.

Once the sugar has dissolved, increase the heat to reach a setting point of 104.5°C (220.1°F). Remove from the heat.

Spoon a small amount on to the chilled plate and see if it wrinkles when you push a finger through (though this should be a soft set jam). If not, return to the heat and boil again for 10 minutes with another dose of lemon juice, then test as above.

When the jam is set, pot and seal while still hot. The jam will keep for 12 months in a cool, dark place.

Buy your own copy

Good Food Food For Your Table is available from our Online Shop

Ingredients

Makes 5 × 330g jars

1kg Mixed berries (strawberries, raspberries, redcurrants, blackcurrants, tayberries, loganberries)
100ml Lemon juice, plus more if needed
1kg Golden granulated sugar

Equipment

Juicer

5 x 330ml jam jars and lids
Plate

1 large saucepan

Jam thermometer